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Capital Flight and the Hollowing Out of the Philippine Economy in the Neoliberal Regime

By Edsel L. Beja, Jr. | May, 2006

ABSTRACT: Capital flight is the movement of capital from a resource-scarce developing country to avoid social controls, and measured as net unrecorded capital outflow. Capital flight from the Philippines was $16 billion in the 1970s, $36 billion in the 1980s, and $43 billion in the 1990s. Indeed these figures are significant amounts of lost resources that could have been utilized in the country to generate additional output and jobs. Capital flight from the Philippines followed a revolving door process – that is, capital inflows were used to finance the capital outflows. This process became more pronounced with financial liberalization in the 1990s. With these results, we argue that capital flight resulted in the hollowing out of the Philippine economy and, more important, neoliberal policies underpinned the process.

External Link: Capital Flight and the Hollowing Out of the Philippine Economy in the Neoliberal Regime

Read More: Economy, Finance, Governance, Philippines, Asia

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